Apple will let iPhone users repair their own devices

person Posté par: Reuters list Dans: Investir Sur:
Apple will let iPhone users repair their own devices

Apple plans to give customers the ability to repair their own devices amid growing pressure from regulators and consumers around the world for manufacturers to ease restrictions on fixing products.

Apple plans to give customers the ability to repair their own devices amid growing pressure from regulators and consumers around the world for manufacturers to ease restrictions on fixing products.

The company on Wednesday announced a new program that will make spare parts for Apple products available to purchase starting early next year. The program, known as Self Service Repair, will let users fix broken devices using repair manuals that Apple will post on its website.

Apple (AAPL) plans to start with some components that tend to require replacement such as displays, batteries and camera modules. The company says it will have more than 200 parts and tools available at launch and plans for more to be added later next year. The repair program will initially be available only for iPhone 12 and iPhone 13 users, but will later expand to Mac computers that use Apple's new in-house M1 chip.

The company will only reveal the prices of its spare parts when the program formally launches next year, but Apple said it will charge individual users the same prices it currently charges independent repair providers.

Apple's move comes as electronics manufacturers — as well as the makers of everything from tractors to hospital equipment — face increasing pressure to ease restrictions on independent device repair shops or DIY repairs, a push known as the "right to repair" movement. Companies have been criticized for using tactics that make it harder for independent repair businesses to access devices, such as using non-removable memory or batteries, or sealing devices with special glue. Critics argue these tactics can lead to more costs for consumers, hurt independent repair shops and be bad for the environment.

President Joe Biden passed an executive order in July that directed the Federal Trade Commission to issue rules requiring companies to allow DIY repairs. Days later, the FTC unanimously voted to condemn existing repair restrictions by manufacturers, with the agency's chair, Lina Khan, vowing to "root out" illegal repair restrictions that may flout US antitrust and consumer protection laws.

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Apple plans to give customers the ability to repair their own devices amid growing pressure from regulators and consumers around the world for manufacturers to ease restrictions on fixing products.

The company on Wednesday announced a new program that will make spare parts for Apple products available to purchase starting early next year. The program, known as Self Service Repair, will let users fix broken devices using repair manuals that Apple will post on its website.

Apple (AAPL) plans to start with some components that tend to require replacement such as displays, batteries and camera modules. The company says it will have more than 200 parts and tools available at launch and plans for more to be added later next year. The repair program will initially be available only for iPhone 12 and iPhone 13 users, but will later expand to Mac computers that use Apple's new in-house M1 chip.

The company will only reveal the prices of its spare parts when the program formally launches next year, but Apple said it will charge individual users the same prices it currently charges independent repair providers.

Apple's move comes as electronics manufacturers — as well as the makers of everything from tractors to hospital equipment — face increasing pressure to ease restrictions on independent device repair shops or DIY repairs, a push known as the "right to repair" movement. Companies have been criticized for using tactics that make it harder for independent repair businesses to access devices, such as using non-removable memory or batteries, or sealing devices with special glue. Critics argue these tactics can lead to more costs for consumers, hurt independent repair shops and be bad for the environment.

President Joe Biden passed an executive order in July that directed the Federal Trade Commission to issue rules requiring companies to allow DIY repairs. Days later, the FTC unanimously voted to condemn existing repair restrictions by manufacturers, with the agency's chair, Lina Khan, vowing to "root out" illegal repair restrictions that may flout US antitrust and consumer protection laws.

Apple plans to give customers the ability to repair their own devices amid growing pressure from regulators and consumers around the world for manufacturers to ease restrictions on fixing products.

The company on Wednesday announced a new program that will make spare parts for Apple products available to purchase starting early next year. The program, known as Self Service Repair, will let users fix broken devices using repair manuals that Apple will post on its website.

Apple (AAPL) plans to start with some components that tend to require replacement such as displays, batteries and camera modules. The company says it will have more than 200 parts and tools available at launch and plans for more to be added later next year. The repair program will initially be available only for iPhone 12 and iPhone 13 users, but will later expand to Mac computers that use Apple's new in-house M1 chip.

The company will only reveal the prices of its spare parts when the program formally launches next year, but Apple said it will charge individual users the same prices it currently charges independent repair providers.

Apple's move comes as electronics manufacturers — as well as the makers of everything from tractors to hospital equipment — face increasing pressure to ease restrictions on independent device repair shops or DIY repairs, a push known as the "right to repair" movement. Companies have been criticized for using tactics that make it harder for independent repair businesses to access devices, such as using non-removable memory or batteries, or sealing devices with special glue. Critics argue these tactics can lead to more costs for consumers, hurt independent repair shops and be bad for the environment.

President Joe Biden passed an executive order in July that directed the Federal Trade Commission to issue rules requiring companies to allow DIY repairs. Days later, the FTC unanimously voted to condemn existing repair restrictions by manufacturers, with the agency's chair, Lina Khan, vowing to "root out" illegal repair restrictions that may flout US antitrust and consumer protection laws.

Apple plans to give customers the ability to repair their own devices amid growing pressure from regulators and consumers around the world for manufacturers to ease restrictions on fixing products.

The company on Wednesday announced a new program that will make spare parts for Apple products available to purchase starting early next year. The program, known as Self Service Repair, will let users fix broken devices using repair manuals that Apple will post on its website.

Apple (AAPL) plans to start with some components that tend to require replacement such as displays, batteries and camera modules. The company says it will have more than 200 parts and tools available at launch and plans for more to be added later next year. The repair program will initially be available only for iPhone 12 and iPhone 13 users, but will later expand to Mac computers that use Apple's new in-house M1 chip.

The company will only reveal the prices of its spare parts when the program formally launches next year, but Apple said it will charge individual users the same prices it currently charges independent repair providers.

Apple's move comes as electronics manufacturers — as well as the makers of everything from tractors to hospital equipment — face increasing pressure to ease restrictions on independent device repair shops or DIY repairs, a push known as the "right to repair" movement. Companies have been criticized for using tactics that make it harder for independent repair businesses to access devices, such as using non-removable memory or batteries, or sealing devices with special glue. Critics argue these tactics can lead to more costs for consumers, hurt independent repair shops and be bad for the environment.

President Joe Biden passed an executive order in July that directed the Federal Trade Commission to issue rules requiring companies to allow DIY repairs. Days later, the FTC unanimously voted to condemn existing repair restrictions by manufacturers, with the agency's chair, Lina Khan, vowing to "root out" illegal repair restrictions that may flout US antitrust and consumer protection laws.

Apple plans to give customers the ability to repair their own devices amid growing pressure from regulators and consumers around the world for manufacturers to ease restrictions on fixing products.

The company on Wednesday announced a new program that will make spare parts for Apple products available to purchase starting early next year. The program, known as Self Service Repair, will let users fix broken devices using repair manuals that Apple will post on its website.

Apple (AAPL) plans to start with some components that tend to require replacement such as displays, batteries and camera modules. The company says it will have more than 200 parts and tools available at launch and plans for more to be added later next year. The repair program will initially be available only for iPhone 12 and iPhone 13 users, but will later expand to Mac computers that use Apple's new in-house M1 chip.

The company will only reveal the prices of its spare parts when the program formally launches next year, but Apple said it will charge individual users the same prices it currently charges independent repair providers.

Apple's move comes as electronics manufacturers — as well as the makers of everything from tractors to hospital equipment — face increasing pressure to ease restrictions on independent device repair shops or DIY repairs, a push known as the "right to repair" movement. Companies have been criticized for using tactics that make it harder for independent repair businesses to access devices, such as using non-removable memory or batteries, or sealing devices with special glue. Critics argue these tactics can lead to more costs for consumers, hurt independent repair shops and be bad for the environment.

President Joe Biden passed an executive order in July that directed the Federal Trade Commission to issue rules requiring companies to allow DIY repairs. Days later, the FTC unanimously voted to condemn existing repair restrictions by manufacturers, with the agency's chair, Lina Khan, vowing to "root out" illegal repair restrictions that may flout US antitrust and consumer protection laws.

Apple plans to give customers the ability to repair their own devices amid growing pressure from regulators and consumers around the world for manufacturers to ease restrictions on fixing products.

Apple plans to give customers the ability to repair their own devices amid growing pressure from regulators and consumers around the world for manufacturers to ease restrictions on fixing products.

Apple plans to give customers the ability to repair their own devices amid growing pressure from regulators and consumers around the world for manufacturers to ease restrictions on fixing products.

Apple plans to give customers the ability to repair their own devices amid growing pressure from regulators and consumers around the world for manufacturers to ease restrictions on fixing products.

Apple plans to give customers the ability to repair their own devices amid growing pressure from regulators and consumers around the world for manufacturers to ease restrictions on fixing products.

Apple plans to give customers the ability to repair their own devices amid growing pressure from regulators and consumers around the world for manufacturers to ease restrictions on fixing products.

524ha cong tientienhc@brainos.vn At Nulla id tincidunt ut sed semper vel Lorem condimentum ornare. Laoreet Vestibulum lacinia massa a commodo habitasse velit Vestibulum tincidunt In12021-11-04 05:08:07 2513b-blog-2.jpg111011092021-11-042021-11-04 05:08:07joomla,prestashop,leothemejoomla,prestashop,leothemejoomla,prestashop,leothemejoomla,prestashop,leothemejoomla,prestashop,leothemejoomla,prestashop,leothemeWhy Amazon is opening an in-person cloud skills center to train workers for other companiesWhy Amazon is opening an in-person cloud skills center to train workers for other companiesWhy Amazon is opening an in-person cloud skills center to train workers for other companiesWhy Amazon is opening an in-person cloud skills center to train workers for other companiesWhy Amazon is opening an in-person cloud skills center to train workers for other companiesWhy Amazon is opening an in-person cloud skills center to train workers for other companiesIpsum cursus vestibulum at interdum VivamusIpsum cursus vestibulum at interdum VivamusIpsum cursus vestibulum at interdum VivamusIpsum cursus vestibulum at interdum VivamusIpsum cursus vestibulum at interdum VivamusIpsum cursus vestibulum at interdum Vivamuswhy-amazon-is-opening-an-in-person-cloud-skills-center-to-train-workers-for-other-companieswhy-amazon-is-opening-an-in-person-cloud-skills-center-to-train-workers-for-other-companieswhy-amazon-is-opening-an-in-person-cloud-skills-center-to-train-workers-for-other-companieswhy-amazon-is-opening-an-in-person-cloud-skills-center-to-train-workers-for-other-companieswhy-amazon-is-opening-an-in-person-cloud-skills-center-to-train-workers-for-other-companieswhy-amazon-is-opening-an-in-person-cloud-skills-center-to-train-workers-for-other-companies

Entering the new Amazon Web Services Skills Center is a bit like walking into a high-tech museum. Among its exhibits are a rotating, globe-shaped screen that displays images of planets or weather patterns, an interactive "smart home" model and a table full of small robot vehicles trained by machine learning.

The space is designed to introduce visitors to practical applications of cloud computing — an increasingly popular set-up in which companies' technical operations are run in data centers managed by Amazon or other cloud companies, rather than in costly on-site servers. AWS hopes the center will interest some visitors in the possibility of a career in the industry.

The Skills Center, which is located on Amazon's corporate headquarters campus in Seattle, Washington, and opens to the public November 22, is the first of its kind for the company. It's part of a larger commitment to train 29 million people globally in cloud computing by 2025 that AWS made last year.

It's also one of the first major announcements that new AWS chief executive Adam Selipsky has made since taking over from Andy Jassy, who was elevated to Amazon CEO when Jeff Bezos left the post in July.

The Skills Center is "going to be a free, accessible space for anybody who wants to learn more about cloud computing, what it is, what the applications are ... everything that illustrates the true breadth of the cloud, and importantly, there's going to be a lot of skills training here," Selipsky told CNN Business in an exclusive interview ahead of the center's opening.

"There's a dramatic need for digital skills overall, and for cloud skills in particular, and this is part of a very broad effort," he said. "We're going to invest hundreds of millions of dollars to bring that training to tens of millions of people worldwide."

Entering the new Amazon Web Services Skills Center is a bit like walking into a high-tech museum. Among its exhibits are a rotating, globe-shaped screen that displays images of planets or weather patterns, an interactive "smart home" model and a table full of small robot vehicles trained by machine learning.

The space is designed to introduce visitors to practical applications of cloud computing — an increasingly popular set-up in which companies' technical operations are run in data centers managed by Amazon or other cloud companies, rather than in costly on-site servers. AWS hopes the center will interest some visitors in the possibility of a career in the industry.

The Skills Center, which is located on Amazon's corporate headquarters campus in Seattle, Washington, and opens to the public November 22, is the first of its kind for the company. It's part of a larger commitment to train 29 million people globally in cloud computing by 2025 that AWS made last year.

It's also one of the first major announcements that new AWS chief executive Adam Selipsky has made since taking over from Andy Jassy, who was elevated to Amazon CEO when Jeff Bezos left the post in July.

The Skills Center is "going to be a free, accessible space for anybody who wants to learn more about cloud computing, what it is, what the applications are ... everything that illustrates the true breadth of the cloud, and importantly, there's going to be a lot of skills training here," Selipsky told CNN Business in an exclusive interview ahead of the center's opening.

"There's a dramatic need for digital skills overall, and for cloud skills in particular, and this is part of a very broad effort," he said. "We're going to invest hundreds of millions of dollars to bring that training to tens of millions of people worldwide."

Entering the new Amazon Web Services Skills Center is a bit like walking into a high-tech museum. Among its exhibits are a rotating, globe-shaped screen that displays images of planets or weather patterns, an interactive "smart home" model and a table full of small robot vehicles trained by machine learning.

The space is designed to introduce visitors to practical applications of cloud computing — an increasingly popular set-up in which companies' technical operations are run in data centers managed by Amazon or other cloud companies, rather than in costly on-site servers. AWS hopes the center will interest some visitors in the possibility of a career in the industry.

The Skills Center, which is located on Amazon's corporate headquarters campus in Seattle, Washington, and opens to the public November 22, is the first of its kind for the company. It's part of a larger commitment to train 29 million people globally in cloud computing by 2025 that AWS made last year.

It's also one of the first major announcements that new AWS chief executive Adam Selipsky has made since taking over from Andy Jassy, who was elevated to Amazon CEO when Jeff Bezos left the post in July.

The Skills Center is "going to be a free, accessible space for anybody who wants to learn more about cloud computing, what it is, what the applications are ... everything that illustrates the true breadth of the cloud, and importantly, there's going to be a lot of skills training here," Selipsky told CNN Business in an exclusive interview ahead of the center's opening.

"There's a dramatic need for digital skills overall, and for cloud skills in particular, and this is part of a very broad effort," he said. "We're going to invest hundreds of millions of dollars to bring that training to tens of millions of people worldwide."

Entering the new Amazon Web Services Skills Center is a bit like walking into a high-tech museum. Among its exhibits are a rotating, globe-shaped screen that displays images of planets or weather patterns, an interactive "smart home" model and a table full of small robot vehicles trained by machine learning.

The space is designed to introduce visitors to practical applications of cloud computing — an increasingly popular set-up in which companies' technical operations are run in data centers managed by Amazon or other cloud companies, rather than in costly on-site servers. AWS hopes the center will interest some visitors in the possibility of a career in the industry.

The Skills Center, which is located on Amazon's corporate headquarters campus in Seattle, Washington, and opens to the public November 22, is the first of its kind for the company. It's part of a larger commitment to train 29 million people globally in cloud computing by 2025 that AWS made last year.

It's also one of the first major announcements that new AWS chief executive Adam Selipsky has made since taking over from Andy Jassy, who was elevated to Amazon CEO when Jeff Bezos left the post in July.

The Skills Center is "going to be a free, accessible space for anybody who wants to learn more about cloud computing, what it is, what the applications are ... everything that illustrates the true breadth of the cloud, and importantly, there's going to be a lot of skills training here," Selipsky told CNN Business in an exclusive interview ahead of the center's opening.

"There's a dramatic need for digital skills overall, and for cloud skills in particular, and this is part of a very broad effort," he said. "We're going to invest hundreds of millions of dollars to bring that training to tens of millions of people worldwide."

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